How to become a level3 support tech/sysadmin

edited April 4 in Help

Greetings!

I currently have a part time hosting support job.(US company)
Just about 1 shift per week still.

The owner says I am doing extremely good. I have been a programmer for 7 years but I like to field much more.

I did the 8 hour shift today and I did not even get up to have water. Its very fun.

Do you have an idea on a list of books to read in order to become a very good sysadmin/technician?
Perhaps a certification pathway?

Many thanks
Dilshan

Stay safe and healthy. Donate to the WFP.

Comments

  • AnthonySmithAnthonySmith AdministratorHosting Provider

    Start with the basics and get a solid foundation, while some may laugh or scoff at this suggestion I recommend that you start by going through the Linux+ while it may cover things you already know it will help build a good foundation/base to start from.

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  • mikhomikho Hosting ProviderOG

    As Anthony says, when you know the foundation, the harder problems are easier to solve as you know what to look for to fix the problems.

    Get 4 or more NAT servers (mix/match between packages) and get a 20 % recurring discount. https://clients.mrvm.net

  • AnthonySmithAnthonySmith AdministratorHosting Provider

    I did the Linux+ after being a Windows server/desktop admin for about 10 years, there are always gaps unless you start at the beginning.

    Thanked by (1)gwndilshan1989

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  • Pluralsight is free at the moment

    https://www.pluralsight.com/

    Thanked by (2)gwndilshan1989 mikho
  • @havoc said:
    Pluralsight is free at the moment

    https://www.pluralsight.com/

    Thank you but videos are not my thing... Books work for me =)

    Thanked by (1)bikegremlin

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  • comicomi OG
    edited April 4

    @AnthonySmith said: there are always gaps

    period ;-)

    @gwndilshan1989
    "UNIX & Linux System Administration Handbook"
    This is IMO the book. It has had many editions over the years.
    But as with any book in a fast changing field it's already old when it's printed.
    So I suggest you look at this book's index and read the more uptodate online sources on the topics you find in the index.

    Karabudera

  • I have a student subscription to the ACM which gives me free access to several ebook libraries like O'reilly.
    Time to browse for the recommendations... Thanks good people!

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  • AK_KWHAK_KWH Hosting ProviderOG

    try udemy There had many courses related it :)

    Thanked by (1)gwndilshan1989

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  • Certifications are mostly useless. Don't know about general purpose books: if there's a specific topic you find yourself wanting to know about, read a book about that topic.

  • From my experience: start at level 1, kill the boss at the end, then level 2 and so on...

    On a more serious note, in addition to what the others here have recommended: you said you already work with a hosting provider. I'd try talking with other, more experienced and knowledgeable colleagues. If you are good and willing to learn, some might even enjoy teaching you - it is a joy teaching someone who is quick on the uptake and happy to learn.

    Mostly harmless ™
    I/O Gremlin

  • @willie said:
    Certifications are mostly useless. Don't know about general purpose books: if there's a specific topic you find yourself wanting to know about, read a book about that topic.

    I disgree with this. Certs give people a goal, and they do provide some interesting information. The CCNA is definitely worth it.

    Next, they every helpful to contractors as they establish credentials.

  • WSSWSS Retired

    @FlamingSpaceJunk said:

    @willie said:
    Certifications are mostly useless. Don't know about general purpose books: if there's a specific topic you find yourself wanting to know about, read a book about that topic.

    I disgree with this. Certs give people a goal, and they do provide some interesting information. The CCNA is definitely worth it.

    Next, they every helpful to contractors as they establish credentials.

    Pretty sure he means Network+ and similarly worthless certifications.

    My pronouns are asshole/asshole/asshole. I will give you the same courtesy.

  • New Google SRE book is likely to be interesting. I liked the old one.

    https://landing.google.com/sre/books/

    Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=22815453

    Thanked by (1)gwndilshan1989
  • edited April 17

    @WSS said:
    Pretty sure he means Network+ and similarly worthless certifications.

    The A+ cert, circa 2001, is the only thing from CompTIA I have experience with, so I'm really not sure how the rest of their stuff stacks up. Collecting and maintaining certs isn't a hobby of mine. :lol:

    I've seen the same argument applied to pretty much everything that isn't real world experience. College degrees, certs, MOOCs, etc. While they aren't a substitute for knowing the how things work in real life, because things generally don't work like they're supposed to, they do provide a base with stubs to explore that wouldn't be there otherwise.

  • WSSWSS Retired

    @FlamingSpaceJunk said:
    I've seen the same argument applied to pretty much everything that isn't real world experience. College degrees, certs, MOOCs, etc. While they aren't a substitute for knowing the how things work in real life, because things generally don't work like they're supposed to, they do provide a base with stubs to explore that wouldn't be there otherwise.

    Pretty sure most of us don't even remember what a serial mouse looks like or if we need to share an IRQ with a printer and a sound card. In the last 20+ years.

    That said, I can still do it in my sleep.

    My pronouns are asshole/asshole/asshole. I will give you the same courtesy.

  • @WSS said:
    Pretty sure most of us don't even remember what a serial mouse looks like or if we need to share an IRQ with a printer and a sound card. In the last 20+ years.

    That said, I can still do it in my sleep.

    I'm pretty sure no one has seen a parallel port printer in the last 20 years either.

  • @willie said:
    New Google SRE book is likely to be interesting. I liked the old one.

    https://landing.google.com/sre/books/

    Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=22815453

    Thanks man!

    Stay safe and healthy. Donate to the WFP.

  • Hi everyone, I subscribed to the Linux+ video course by Sander van Vugt. The guy is great.

    Stay safe and healthy. Donate to the WFP.

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